Postgres never ceases to amaze me

I’ve been using Postgresql for years now, those who know me, know fine well that it’s my absolute favorite database in the whole wide world. Those who know me may also recall I do a lot of GIS and mapping work using Spatial SQL among other things.

For a recent project I was working on, I was required to model a 3D landscape/terrain of a given location.

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Retaining Software Developers in Your Company

Fellow Pluralsight author Stephen Haunts has just written a though provoking piece on Developer/Workplace ethics and he’s asking for peoples comments…

Stephen Haunts { Coding in the Trenches }

As a company owner or hiring manager, attracting software developers into your organisation is one challenge. You have to hook them in with a job specification and then sell your company to them in an interview as-well as gauge their technical abilities.

But once a developer starts at your company, you then have to retain them. The jobs market is quite vibrant at the moment and developers have a plentiful choice of companies to go to as a permanent or contractor developers.

Retaining Software Developers in Your Company Retaining Software Developers in Your Company

On-boarding and training up a new developer is quite a large commitment to a company in terms of time and costs, so how do you keep a developer engaged and wanting to stay so they can be productive and give a return on your investment.

In this short article I want to share some of my thoughts and view on this, but…

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TDD is not the Failure, our Culture of Development Is

Awesome teardown Marc 🙂

Marc Clifton

In the article TDD is dead.  Long live testing.  and a subsequent response The pitfalls of Test-Driven Development, both authors, in my opinion, are missing the mark by a mile. In the real world, walking into an existing code base, the reason you need TDD (but can’t use it) is because programmers didn’t spend sufficient time on good architecture practices, resulting in code that is an entangled morass of intertwined concerns, and yes, as one of the author’s points out, because the code itself was never intended to be tested except through, at best, acceptance test procedures (most likely the pen and paper variety — with the developer watching in the background hoping he rolls a 20.)  There is an overall lack of attention paid to designing a component with sufficient abstraction that it can accommodate changing requirements, and little or no attention paid to separating (decoupling) the behaviors between components…

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An Interview with Crossroads PR

I was recently interviewed by Jennifer Gardner from Crossroads PR for a series of Author Q&A/Profiles commissioned by Syncfusion for their authors in the succinctly range.

Unfortunately my responses where too long for the post to go on the Syncfusion Blog, so they had to be shortened.

Beacuse of that, I’m reproducing the full unedited version here for those who’d like to read it

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Resharper Succinctly Released

My 5th E-book in the Succinctly series of free E-book by .NET tools vendor Syncfusion was released yesterday.

The subject of this book is the Visual Studio developer add-on “Resharper” written by Jet-Brains.

If your curious as to what it does and how it can help you become a better developer, you can download the book for free here:

https://www.syncfusion.com/resources/techportal/ebooks/resharper

Happy reading

Shawty

A Lovely Christmas Present for you all (Thanks to Syncfusion)

For those of you who knew it was coming, or just those of you who are looking for a quick developer friendly guide to the subject.

My fourth book in the Succinctly E-book series (Published by Syncfusion) was released today.

Twitter Bootstrap 3 Succinctly follows on where my previous one on the version 2 framework of the same name, left off.
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HTML5 Validation

I recently got asked what HTML5 validation looks like.

Needless to say this was a bit of a strange question, but as I read on through the question, I realized that is wasn’t a case of not knowing what HTML5 validation looks like, but a case of where jQuery validation stopped and the HTML5 stuff started.

In this quick post, I’m going to briefly cover the HTML5 validation stuff in the hopes it’ll clear a few things up.
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