Syncfusion E-Book Number 7

Can you believe it’s 3 years since I wrote my first eBook for the Syncfusion Succinctly series, back in January 2013 Syncfusion released “GIS Succinctly”, I never really though it would go much further than that because I really didn’t believe I had that much to offer as a technical writer.
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Lidnug & Scott Guthrie – 4th August 2015

The GU is coming back to LIDNUG!!!

The Alchemy Bin

LidnugScottGuImage-01

It is with great pleasure that I add this to my blog.

On the 4th of August, Scott Guthrie (Microsoft Corporate VP) himself will be kindly holding is 18th live Q&A session with Lidnug. This is a free event hosted online via Live Meeting and all are welcome to come along.

The time of this event is Tuesday, August 4th 2015, from 10:00AM to 11:30 AM (PDT)

You can register your interest on Eventbrite here…

Eventbrite

Do note you can add this even to your calendar via Eventbrite and please double check time conversions to your local time when doing so.

Once the event is close to starting, the links required to join the session will be posted/sent out. Also; we strongly advise that if you’re going to do this session, to use a windows machine and install the Windows LM Client.

Look forward to see you there and if you have any…

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User Experience Design Goes Deeper Than Tools or Strategies

An excellent post by my good friend and fellow Lidnug manager, Gavin Lanata.

The Alchemy Bin

As many have said, it is fair to say that if you are designing a User Experience for software you are probably doing one or more of the following – Visual Design, Interaction Design, and User Research.

This is in no way a complete list.

These disciplines are the tools or patterns which are used to implement a great user experience. Great, so according to what we’ve just talked about, if we use these tools and mix in many of the well talked about strategies dotted around we should end up with a great user experience.

Well, maybe; depending on the context of the design you are chasing after.

A good friend of mine recently told me about a conversation he’d had with a company offering their services as software developers. Only they weren’t offering their services as software developers, instead they were offering experiences. In their words—’people don’t want…

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My 6th Syncfusion E-Book has been released

So here it is at last, my Syncfusion Succinctly E-Book on CSS3

100 Pages of info all about the latest CSS specification for those wanting to learn it, as pleased as I am with it however, there was a huge amount I had to leave out of it.

Continue reading “My 6th Syncfusion E-Book has been released”

Postgres never ceases to amaze me

I’ve been using Postgresql for years now, those who know me, know fine well that it’s my absolute favorite database in the whole wide world. Those who know me may also recall I do a lot of GIS and mapping work using Spatial SQL among other things.

For a recent project I was working on, I was required to model a 3D landscape/terrain of a given location.

Continue reading “Postgres never ceases to amaze me”

Retaining Software Developers in Your Company

Fellow Pluralsight author Stephen Haunts has just written a though provoking piece on Developer/Workplace ethics and he’s asking for peoples comments…

Stephen Haunts { Coding in the Trenches }

As a company owner or hiring manager, attracting software developers into your organisation is one challenge. You have to hook them in with a job specification and then sell your company to them in an interview as-well as gauge their technical abilities.

But once a developer starts at your company, you then have to retain them. The jobs market is quite vibrant at the moment and developers have a plentiful choice of companies to go to as a permanent or contractor developers.

Retaining Software Developers in Your Company Retaining Software Developers in Your Company

On-boarding and training up a new developer is quite a large commitment to a company in terms of time and costs, so how do you keep a developer engaged and wanting to stay so they can be productive and give a return on your investment.

In this short article I want to share some of my thoughts and view on this, but…

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TDD is not the Failure, our Culture of Development Is

Awesome teardown Marc 🙂

Marc Clifton

In the article TDD is dead.  Long live testing.  and a subsequent response The pitfalls of Test-Driven Development, both authors, in my opinion, are missing the mark by a mile. In the real world, walking into an existing code base, the reason you need TDD (but can’t use it) is because programmers didn’t spend sufficient time on good architecture practices, resulting in code that is an entangled morass of intertwined concerns, and yes, as one of the author’s points out, because the code itself was never intended to be tested except through, at best, acceptance test procedures (most likely the pen and paper variety — with the developer watching in the background hoping he rolls a 20.)  There is an overall lack of attention paid to designing a component with sufficient abstraction that it can accommodate changing requirements, and little or no attention paid to separating (decoupling) the behaviors between components…

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